Breaking science news and multimedia, heavy on astronomy and physics (and heavy on citing) New vids, pics, articles, and the occasional research post for ResearchBlogging.org.

Monday, January 31, 2011

Science Pictures in the News: Jan. 31, 2011

Cassini Released a new image today of two of Saturn's moons, Dione and Tethys
"Saturn's ''wispy'' moon Dione lies in front of the cratered surface of the moon Tethys, as seen by the Cassini spacecraft."

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute


Today on BoingBoing, "Shinmoedake erupts: lava, ash and lightning over Japan"
"Lightning dances in Shinmoedake's volcanic plume, the eruption having already led Japanese authorities to call on those living nearby to evacuate."

Image Credit: Minami-Nippon Shimbun


Earth Snapshot has a satellite image of Mexico Released today with vibrant color.  Nice eye candy. "Sediment-Laden Laguna de Términos, Mexico"
"The Laguna de Términos (Términos Lagoon) is made up of a series of rich, sediment-laden lagoons and tidal estuaries connected by two channels to the Bay of Campeche in the southern part of Gulf of Mexico, in the southwestern part of the Mexican state of Campeche"

Image Credit: Chelys


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Science Pictures in the News: Jan.25, 2011

The Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING) Released a new image today of the
Cat's Eye Nebula

Image Credit: D. López and R. Barrena (IAC)


Earth Observatory's Image of the Day:
Landslides in Brazil
After weeks of cloud cover, the ASTER instrument on Terra satellite collected this image of the mudslide-riven Serrana region of Brazil on January 18, 2011

Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using data provided courtesy of NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Mike Carlowicz


NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD)
The Rippled Red Ribbons of SNR 0509
What is causing the picturesque ripples of supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5? The ripples, as well as the greater nebula, were imaged in unprecedented detail by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2006 and again late last year. The red color was recoded by a Hubble filter that left only the light emitted by energetic hydrogen.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgment: J. Hughes (Rutgers U.)


Today's Post over at Discover Blogs: Discoblog:
"It’s the End of the Kilogram as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)"
The British have a quite arbitrary unit in the Kilogram.  This standard is a piece of metal laying around in a safe:
"a cylinder of platinum-iridium about 39mm high, 39mm in diameter, cast by Johnson Matthey in Hatton Garden in 1879, delivered to the International Committee on Weights and Measures in Sevres shortly afterwards, polished and adjusted to be made equal in mass to the mass of the old French kilogram of the archives which dates from the time of the French Revolution."
Discussions are underway to reevaluate this unit, potentially changing its value to a proportion rooted in physics.  Although worldwide adoption to the changed value would take massive effort, the end result seems to me like OCD tidying up of the metric system.  Don't get me wrong, I do support it fully!


This picture's all over the internet at the moment, and rightly so.  It's absolutely beautiful.  I think Bad Astronomy posted it pretty much before everyone else.  Kudos!  Here's NASA/JPL's Page for the release.
Runaway Star
The blue star near the center of this image is Zeta Ophiuchi. When seen in visible light it appears as a relatively dim red star surrounded by other dim stars and no dust.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA


A collage of Mars Posted on Universe Today
The 7 Year Long Journey of Opportunity
"This collage of three maps (left, top) and a new close up panoramic mosaic of Santa Maria crater on Sol 2464, Dec 29, 2010 (bottom right) shows the route traversed by the Opportunity Mars rover during her nearly 7 year long overland expedition across the Meridiani Planum region of Mars to her current location at Santa Maria Crater. Opportunity landed inside Eagle crater on Jan. 24, 2004 and has driven over 26 km (16 mi) since then. Opportunity arrived at the western rim of Santa Maria Crater on Dec. 16, 2010 on Sol 2451. She is driving around the edge of the 90 m wide crater in a counterclockwise direction on her way to the huge 22 km wide Endeavour crater which shows signatures of water bearing minerals. The rover is visible in top map taken from orbit by MRO spacecraft on New Years Eve, Dec 31, 2010, Sol 2466. The Panoramic Mosaic of Santa Maria Crater on Sol 2464 - at bottom right – was stitched together from raw images taken by Opportunity’s navigation camera. The rover was about 5 meters from the rim and nearing water bearing materials located roughly at the right of this photomosaic."

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell Marco Di Lorenzo, Kenneth Kremer


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Astronomy Pics in the News: Jan. 19, 2011

"Hottest planet is hotter than some stars" Article on New Scientist
A 'year' on WASP-33b lasts just 29 hours

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/G. Bacon/STScI


"The Hidden Galaxy" Article on NASA Photojournal

Maffei 2 is the poster child for an infrared galaxy that is almost invisible to optical telescopes. Foreground dust clouds in our Milky Way galaxy block about 99.5 percent of its visible light. But this infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope penetrates the dust to reveal the galaxy in all its glory.


Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA


"Hidden Treasure Within the Orion Nebula" Article on Universe Today

This new image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile.


Image Credit: ESO and Igor Chekalin


"Sideways Glance for LRO Provides Spectacular View of Aitken Crater" Article on Universe Today
LROC NAC oblique view of Aitken crater, including the central peak, northern walls, and the Constellation Region of Interest. Scene is about 30 km wide

Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University


"Distinctive Rayed Impact Crater in Meridiani Planum" Article on HiRISE
This "fresh" (very well-preserved) impact crater has created a radial pattern of dark rays. The image was suggested to address the question of why the rays are dark.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Astronomy Pictures in the News, arXiv Edition: Jan. 18, 2011

For your viewing pleasure, here's a selection of astronomy pictures within arXiv papers released today.  Let the eye candy lure you into reading these papers on the cutting edge of science!

"The Sky is for Everyone - Outreach and Educaction with the Virtual Observatory"

The VO-software Aladin; depicting an image of the Carina Nebula taken by the Hubble Telescope with an overlay of catalogue data from the Vizier Database


Credit: Cite 1 (at bottom)


Stellarium shows how the sky will look like. The moon, a satellite and the orbit of Saturn is visible


Credit: Cite 1 (at bottom)



"Triggered Star Formation"


Region of the galaxy M51 viewed with the ACS camera of HST, showing bubbles

Credit: Cite 2 (at bottom)


A pillar in IC 1396 viewed at 8µm with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Class I sources (the youngest) are identified by diamond shapes. There are three at the front of the head, one near the back part of the head, two on the lower part of the pillar and another in a shelf nearby


Credit: Cite 2 (at bottom)


MilkyWay region W79, consisting of a shell with dense clouds and star formation at the edge


Credit: Cite 2 (at bottom)



"Star Formation in Spiral Arms"

Hubble Space Telescope image of NGC 4414, from multiple passbands

Credit: Cite 3 (at bottom)


Hubble Space Telescope image of NGC 5194, from multiple passbands

Credit: Cite 3 (at bottom)

Such beauty in the skies!

Cite 1:
Florian Freistetter, Giulia Iafrate, & Massimo Ramella (2011). The Sky is for Everyone - Outreach and Educaction with the Virtual
Observatory Communicating Astronomy with the Publich, 10, 18-21 (2010) arXiv: 1101.3061v1


Cite 2:
Bruce G. Elmegreen (2011). Triggered Star Formation arXiv arXiv: 1101.3112v1

Cite 3:
Bruce G. Elmegreen (2011). Star Formation in Spiral Arms arXiv arXiv: 1101.3109v1






------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Marble Riddle and Solution!

I hope you guys enjoyed the puzzle I posted a few days ago!  I'll reiterate it here and give the solution!

You have 12 marbles.  They are identical in size and shape.  One of the marbles is of a different weight than the other 11, either lighter or heavier.  Using a simple scale ONLY THREE TIMES and with only these marbles, isolate the unique marble AND determine whether it is light or heavy.


Here's my solution:


Step 1) Weigh 1:Amongst the 12, weigh 4 against 4.

Step 1) Condition1) If they weigh even, the candidate is among the 4 you didn't weigh.

Step 2) Weigh 2:Remove one of the 4; put it aside.  Weigh your three candidates with 3 you have discarded.  This will let you know for sure if the odd one out is lighter or heavier.

Step 2) Condition 1) If the scales are even
Step 3) Weigh 3:Weigh your isolated 1 vs a discarded standard one.  DONE

If Step 2) Condition 2) is an uneven scale, you know for sure now whether the odd one out is lighter or heavier.
At this point your Step 3) Weigh 3 involves weighing 2 of your remaining 3.  If the scales are even, the odd one out is the one you most recently discarded.  If the scale is uneven, you know which is the odd one out because you discovered whether the odd one out is lighter or heavier in the last step. DONE

-----

Step 1) Condition2)Assuming your first weigh yielded an uneven result in your 4 vs 4, discard the remaining 4.  This leaves you with 8 candidates, and only two weighs available.  Remember the result (/ or \)

Step 2) Weigh 2: You have four on your left side and four on your right side, with a certain sign (/ or \).  Remove one candidate from the left half and put it aside.  Remove two candidates from the right side and put them aside.  Add a standard discarded marble to the right side.  Finally, swap one of your candidates from the right side with one of your candidates on the left side.  To clear this up: this gives you three candidates on the left side, one which used to reside on the right side.  On the right side is two candidates and a standard marble, with one of those 2 candidates having used to reside on the left side.

Step 2) Condition 1) If the scale is even, you know those 6 you just weighed are all standard, which leaves you simply with the three you have removed in this step as candidates.

Step 3) Weigh 3: On the left side of the scale now, weigh the one marble you had removed from the left side along with one of the marbles you had removed from the right side against 2 standard marbles on the right side.

Step 3) Condition 1) If Step 1) Condition2) was / and Step 3) Condition 1) was an even weigh, then the one on the right side on weigh 2 is now determined to be light. DONE

Step 3) Condition 2) If Step 1) Condition 2) was / and step 3 condition 2 was /, then the one on the left side on weigh 2 is now determined to be heavy. DONE

Step 3) Condition 3)If Step 1) Condition 2) was / and step 3 condition 3 was \, then the candidate that was on the right side on weigh 2 is now determined to be light. DONE

The reasoning is symmetric during Step 3) if Step 1) Condition 3) had been \.

Refer to Step 2) Weigh 2, we continue with condition 2 here:
Step 2) Condition 2) If Weigh 1 was / and Weigh 2 yields /, then the 3 you had removed in Weigh 2) are standard, and don't need to be considered.  Additionally, since the results kept the same sign (/), then the two candidates that you swapped at Weigh 2 were obviously standards, and can be discarded as well. Now either a candidate on the left is heavy, or one of the candidates on the right is light.
Step 3) Weigh 3:  At this point you're left with two candidates on the left and one on the right.  Of these 3, take the one from the left and one from the right and weigh them against two standards.
Step 3) Condition 1) If the scale is even, then the leftover one from the left (that you didn't weigh in Weigh 3) is the odd one out, and heavy.  DONE

Step 3) Condition 2) If the scale is heavy on the side of the candidates, then the one from the right was standard, so the one from the left that you just weighed is the odd one out, and heavy.  DONE

Step 3) Condition 3) If the scale is light on the side of the candidates, then the one from the left was standard, so the one from the right right is the odd one out, and light. DONE

The reasoning is symmetric  if step 1) condition 3) had been \.


Step 2) Condition 3) If Weigh 1 yielded / and then changed to \ in Weigh 2) [or in \ then / inversely], then you know the two you swapped in Weigh 2) are the only two remaining candidates.  At this point you know that the candidate A on the left (remember weigh 2 yielded \) is either light or standard, or candidate B either heavy or standard.

Step 3) Weigh 3: the one to the left [arbitrarily] against a standard.

Step 3) Condition 1) If the scales are even, then A is a standard, so B is heavy.  DONE

Step 3) condition 2) If the scale shows A to be light, then there you go. DONE

Hurrah for logic puzzles!


Took me 7 hours, but it's the hardest puzzle I've ever solved, and satisfying!





------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Top picks for today: Science Links, Jan. 12, 2011

Ethereal quantum state stored in solid crystal

Article on New Scientist

In Deep Galaxy Surveys, Astronomers Get a Boost -- from Gravity

Article on HubbleSite

South Pole Science: Tracking Neutrinos

Article on National Geographic: Breaking Orbit

Musical chills: Why they give us thrills

Article on ScienceDaily

Close-knit pairs of supermassive black holes discovered in merging galaxies

Article on ScienceDaily

Gravitational lensing: Cosmic magnifying lenses distort view of distant galaxies

Article on ScienceDaily

Quantum quirk contained: Discovery moves quantum networks closer to reality

Article on PhysOrg

New 'frozen smoke' material: One ounce could carpet three football fields

Article on PhysOrg

Your nose reveals when you're going to die

Article on Io9


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Science Pics in the News: Jan 12, 2011

NASA's Image of the Day: The Triangulum Galaxy

Image Credit: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler

"Holes in the Sun's corona" Article on PhysOrg

Image Credit: JPL/NASA

Universe Today has an incredible panorama image of the milky way on their Article, "Treasure Hunting With Astrophotography"

Image Credit: ESO

NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) released a few new images today. 
"Galactic City at the Edge of the Universe"

Image Credit: Subaru/NASA/JPL-Caltech
"Standard Candle in the Wind"

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Iowa State

Probably the picture most common on different news sites today, a trillion pixel picture of the night sky! (click to embiggen) Article on ScienceDaily

Image Credit: M. Blanton and the SDSS-III team

HiRISE released a few new pictures of Mars today.  Man do I love these!
"Active Gullies on Martian Sand Dunes"

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
"Inverted Topography near Juventae Chasma" (on Mars)

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
"Russell Crater Dune Gullies" (on Mars)

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Today on Short Sharp Science, "The sundogs of Stockholm"

Image Credit: Peter Rosén

And finally: a super high speed camera captures video of water droplets bouncing on the surface of a hot pan.  These single droplets sending up steam is picturesque!  "Series of video clips showing the leidenfrost effect in action; taken for the highly anticipated book Modernist Cuisine the Art and Science of Cooking, due for release in March 2011"



 
Video Credit: Found via Gizmodo, uploaded to YouTube by ModernistCuisine


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Monday, January 10, 2011

Science Pics in the News, arXiv Edition: Jan. 10, 2011

I scoured the recent arXiv releases and came up with a collection of the best pictures within these research papers.  The general idea is to use some eye candy to motivate people to start reading these truly fascinating arXiv research papers for enjoyment.   

arXiv Abstract/Paper "SPICA: the next generation Infrared Space Telescope"
Spectroscopic mapping speeds of the SPICA far-IR instrument (SAFARI) and Herschel- PACS superposed on a realization of the Millenium simulation at z∼1.4 (Springel et al. 2006). In the center are the footprints of the instantaneous  spectro- scopic FOV of PACS (blue) and SAFARI (yellow). The large green box shows the area covered by SAFARI in a 900 hour spectral full wavelength spectral survey (∼1 degree)

Image Credit: Cite1 (see bottom)

arXiv Abstract/Paper, "A parsec-scale outflow from the luminous YSO IRAS 17527-2439"
WFCAM JHK colour-composite image (J-blue, H-green, K-red) in a 2.5′ ×2.5′ field centred on IRAS 17527:


Image Credit: Cite 2 (see bottom)

arXiv Abstract/Paper "Suzaku X-ray Follow-up Observation of Weak-lensing-detected Halos in the Field around ZwCl0823.2+0425"
A Region used to determine the background model (yellow field). We eliminated regions corresponding to each halo and the foreground bright star near the west edge of the XIS FOV (green circles and ellipses)

Image Credit: Cite3 (see bottom)

arXiv Abstract/Paper "Peculiar Type II Supernovae from Blue Supergiants"
V -band image of SN 2000cb. The SN is located at a projected distance of 4.3 kpc from the nucleus of its host galaxy IC 1158

Image Credit: Cite4 (see bottom)

arXiv Abstract/Paper "Data Challenges for Next-generation Radio Telescopes"
An artist's impression of the Australian SKA pathfinder telescope, due to be completed in 2012. Shown are a few of the 36 12-metre dishes, each equipped with a 100-pixel Phased Array Feed. Image courtesy of CSIRO.

Image Credit: CSIRO/Cite5 (see bottom)

Cite1: 
Javier R. Goicoechea, Takao Nakagawa, & on behalf of the SAFARI/SPICA teams (2011). SPICA: the next generation Infrared Space Telescope arXiv arXiv: 1101.1418v1

Cite2:
Watson P. Varricatt (2011). A parsec-scale outflow from the luminous YSO IRAS 17527-2439 accepted for publication by Astronomy and Astrophysics arXiv: 1101.1510v1

Cite3:
Eri Watanabe, Motokazu Takizawa, Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nobuhiro Okabe, Madoka Kawaharada, Arif Babul, Alexis Finoguenov, Graham P. Smith, & James E. Taylor (2011). Suzaku X-ray Follow-up Observation of Weak-lensing-detected Halos in the
Field around ZwCl0823.2+0425 accepted for publication in PASJ arXiv: 1101.1333v1


Cite4:
Io K. W. Kleiser, Dovi Poznanski, Daniel Kasen, Timothy R. Young, Ryan Chornock, Alexei V. Filippenko, Peter Challis, Mohan Ganeshalingam, Robert P. Kirshner, Weidong Li, Thomas Matheson, Peter E. Nugent, Jeffrey M. Silverman (2011). Peculiar Type II Supernovae from Blue Supergiants Submitted to MNRAS on December 17, 2010 : arXiv:1101.1298v1

Cite5:
Ray P. Norris (2011). Data Challenges for Next-generation Radio Telescopes Accepted for Proceedings of 2010 Sixth IEEE International Conference on e-Science arXiv: 1101.1355v1


 
------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love


ResearchBlogging.org

Sunday, January 9, 2011

Science Pics in the News: Jan 9, 2011

Io9's Article today, "Molten rocks and magma once rained down on the ancient Earth" features a beautiful artist's impression of a major impact that occurred during an extremely early stage of the Earth's formation:

Image Credit: Fahad Sulehria

Discover posted an online version of their printed Article today, "The Dark-Horse Lab That Just Might Figure Out Fusion"  It tells the story of a Dark-Horse Lab's fusion experiment gone wrong.  The resulting explosion didn't hurt anyone, thankfully.

Image Credit: Air Force Research Laboratory

It's a slow day in science news!  Hopefully tomorrow there'll be more images and stories to share!


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Saturday, January 8, 2011

MARBLE RIDDLE

My friend Kurt gave me a logic based riddle he found.  I've been focusing on it for many hours, and I finally solved it.  This is actually why I've missed a couple days of blogging.  Here it is, the Marble Riddle:

You have 12 marbles.  They are identical in size and shape.  One of the marbles is of a different weight than the other 11, either lighter or heavier.  Using a simple scale ONLY THREE TIMES and with only these marbles, isolate the unique marble AND determine whether it is light or heavy.

I wrote out my answer and I will post it tomorrow!  It's a time-eater, I warn you!  Probably the most fun logic riddle I've ever seen.  I'm very proud of myself for figuring out the answer.

A Tip: After developing a strategy, go through it step by step, on paper, to double check and triple check your strategy.  Expect several dead ends.

GOOD LUCK!



Here's the answer post on my blog.
http://astronasty.blogspot.com/2011/01/marble-riddle-and-solution.html


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Science Pics and Links for Jan. 5, 2011

NASA's Image of the Day, a composite image of Venus, radio topography of its north pole:

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS

Today on Boston.com's Big Picture, a stunning view of yesterday's solar eclipse in Spain:

Image Credit: REUTERS/Jon Nazca

The European Southern Observatory, ESO, released this image today, an infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula: "VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon"  To me, it's an awe inspiring reminder of just how small we all are.

 Image Credit: ESO/VVV

An Article on Universe Today, "Did GD61 Eat a Planetessimal?," features this artist's rendition of dusty debris around an old white dwarf star:

Image Credit: NASA


Symmetry Magazine has a fascinating Article today about sonification of data, "Playing by ear in the laboratory"  The general idea is a conversion of a data set into musical tones or frequencies.  As a musician I find this immensely fascinating.  Its usage as a tool in the classroom is very promising, as it is sure to grab the attention and perhaps inspire the young.  As a more serious tool, this sonification of data may allow for a breakthrough level of sensitivity not in gathering information, but in sifting through it.  Our ears are very keen to changes in pitch, and this might allow us to go through a much larger amount of information in a much quicker timespan. 

A new method of detecting Gravity Waves has been proposed.  Today's Article on Ars Technica's Nobel Intent describes how the Interference Patterns exhibited by movement within Bose Einstein Condensates may be more responsive to the extremely slight variations in spacetime that mark the passing of a gravity wave.


------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Today's Top 10 in Science News: Jan. 4, 2011

  1. CultureLab: Near-death neurologist: Dreams on the border of life

  2. the pros and cons of growing skeptic groups » weird things

  3. Quark Matter at RHIC: It’s in the Cards : Brookhaven

  4. New system for analyzing information on WikiLeaks, social media : Science Daily

  5. Trust your gut ... but only sometimes : Science Daily

  6. NEC's 'Earth simulator' succeeds in prediction of photochemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes : PhysOrg

  7. New medication more potent, longer lasting than morphine : PhysOrg

  8. 'Bad' science still rampant in US justice system : PhysOrg

  9. Viking Found Organics on Mars, Experiment Confirms : Discovery News

  10. BBC News - Canadian girl 'youngest to discover supernova'

------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Science Pictures and Videos in the News: Jan. 4, 2011

Lights in the Dark Today posted a picture of Saturn's backlit rings and limb seen by Cassini:

Image Credit: Image: NASA / JPL / SSI / Gordan Ugarkovic

Today on BBC, "Birth and death within Andromeda"

Image Credit: Click to zoom, it's at the bottom of the pic.

The Center for Astrophysics Released some amazing sun pictures today:
  (Click to embiggen, these are good wallpapers)

Image Credit:NASA/LMSAL/SAO (I cropped it)

Image Credit: NASA/LMSAL/SAO

Bad Astronomy's Post today: "INSANELY awesome solar eclipse picture"

Image Credit: Thierry Legault

Today on Discovery News, "On the Trail of Magnetic Monopoles" features this elegant picture below. 

Image Credit: ?? A TinEye search didn't lead me to credits for this, but it did point me to it's posting on a great, if not new "Ask a Physicist" Article on Io9, which also features this uncredited image:

Image Credit: Io9 also didn't credit this, and TinEye is showing only Io9 on its results.

An Article today on PhysOrg: "The impact of double black holes and radio galaxies in the Milky Way"

Image Credit (deep breath): CSIRO/ATNF; ATCA;ASTRON; Parkes;MPIfR; ESO/WFI/AAO (UKST); MPIfR/ESO/APEX; NASA/CXC/CfA

Today's Post on the Planetary Society Blog, "How Mars Express' orbit shifts with time" features this bizzare and fascinating video mapping the orbit of this Mars satellite.



Video Credit: ESOC / video and caption by Thomas Ormston

NASA /JPL Released a new picture today, "Juno Mission to Jupiter (2010 Artist's Concept)"

Image Credit: NASA/JPL



------ Sharing via these buttons will share the current article page, unless your current url is the main page of Astronasty. Click the title of the article to go to an individual article page.
Share Spread the Love

Popular Posts This Month

Follow by Email